DaVinci Resolve is one of the best desktop video editing and color correction solutions. Learn how to optimize DaVinci Resolve for your video workflow.

Resolve has been a household name for high end professional color correction since the mid 1980's. This is long before the technology moved from dedicated hardware costing hundreds of thousands of dollars, to common (and cheap by comparison) desktop computers. In 2009 da Vinci Systems was bought by Blackmagic Design and development began into the feature rich software we know today.

I'm a CSI (Colorist Society International) member colorist, a member of the Digital Cinema Society, and post production technology expert. I'm also a DaVinci Resolve trainer. I do this for a living, and advise and consult on Resolve systems and related post production infrastructure such as shared storage systems, control, and calibrated monitoring.

I'm building this resource to help give anyone interested in professional post production a head start regardless of budget or starting skill level.

Learn DaVinci Resolve

Learning to use (and master) a professional video color correction toolset is one of the best investments you can make in yourself. There are a large number of paid and free resources available online to learn. While you're not going to become a professional colorist overnight, it's a rewarding journey that will also improve every other aspect of your video skillset.

DaVinci Resolve is however a resource hungry application, and requires some thought and planning when it comes to what hardware you'll run it on. A fast enough computer is only the beginning. You also need fast media storage, and a strategy to handle backups and archive of your important data.

One of the biggest roadblocks to getting started with Resolve is knowing how to set up your hardware and software environment. Whether you're running Resolve entirely self contained on a laptop, or building a home video editing and color grading suite, my goal is to help answer those questions.

Is DaVinci Resolve Really Free?

Yes and No. DaVinci Resolve is available in two versions called DaVinci Resolve, and DaVinci Resolve Studio. If you're looking to learn, or your projects are up to UHD 2160p resolution, the free version is all you need to get started.

DaVinci Resolve is available to download for free from Blackmagic Design with very few limitations, no trial period, and no watermarking. DaVinci Resolve Studio allows you to work in resolutions above 3840 x 2160 UHD, includes the full set of tools and effects, and costs only $299.

DaVinci Resolve (and Resolve Studio) includes Fusion, an extremely powerful compositing toolset that is integrated directly into the Resolve eco-system. Fusion Studio is also available as standalone software also for $299.

DaVinci Resolve gives you access to the highest quality professional color correction, grading and compositing tools essentially for free.

DaVinci Resolve Hardware and Software Resources

Here you can find all my DaVinci Resolve technical articles and resources. Please bookmark this page, and come back to check for updates.

If you're an iPhone videographer, you can also check my iPhone video color grading tutorials.

DaVinci Resolve Hardware

The Best Budget Laptops for DaVinci Resolve In 2020 with Thunderbolt 3

Buying a laptop to run DaVinci Resolve on a $1500 to $2000 budget is easier than you’d think, I’ve selected a few excellent options.

The Best Low Budget Resolve Monitoring and Video Color Management

Most independent creators overlook monitoring and video color management. Here is a complete low budget DaVinci Resolve monitoring solution for under $2200.

The Best DaVinci Resolve eGPU Options

Give your Thunderbolt 3 equipped laptop a boost when running DaVinci Resolve with the Blackmagic eGPU, Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box and eGFX Breakaway Puck.

DaVinci Resolve Minimum System Requirements & Recommended Hardware

DaVinci Resolve is the NLE and color grading software of choice for many creators. Not all of us have the best hardware, so what works and what doesn’t?

Optimizing DaVinci Resolve

AVC / H.264 / HEVC and DaVinci Resolve | Why You Need to Transcode

If you are experiencing poor video playback of AVC / H.264 / HEVC codecs in DaVinci Resolve, here’s what you need to know.